Welcome ES6 !! JavaScript Is Not Fancy Anymore

For years, JavaScript was considered as a toy language. It was used for creating interactive web pages and could run only in the browser. But, things changed; JavaScript is used in both, the server and the browser these days. The simplicity of the language made it so popular that developers started using it for large and complex projects.

However, new developers felt JavaScript was fancy at times. This was because of some of the known drawbacks in the language itself — and the workarounds put in place for fixing them. For example, a developer from a “C” language background is more familiar to block level scoping, but will have difficulties understanding lexical scoping in JavaScript. Along with lexical scoping, variable hoisting and closures might seem fancy or difficult to understand as well.

ES6, the future version, is going to give a vast makeover to JavaScript. The TC39 committee (responsible for ES6 standardization) have taken care of most of the concerns about JavaScript, and now ES6 is getting a lot of new features added, and existing bad parts fixed. If you want to know about the JavaScript good vs bad parts, check out Douglas Crockford’s book JavaScript, the Good Parts.

This post is not about the complete ES6 feature-set. Here, we will see some of the areas of JavaScript that look fancy, and how they are getting improved in ES6.

Newsletter #59

Hello, It’s #TechThursday at #namshi again!

News from the IT Team: Well, not so much today, it was a short week thanks to the cool EID break :)

But what has the team been looking at over the past week? Below you’ll find the usual list of interesting articles we discovered in the past 7 days.

Newsletter #58

Hello, It’s #TechThursday at #namshi again!

News from the IT Team:

Our fella Hallal is back from Symfony Live London and he wrote a nice recap, go and check it out.

But what has the team been looking at over the past week? Below you’ll find the usual list of interesting articles we discovered in the past 7 days.

What Went Down at SymfonyLive London?

SymfonyLive SymfonyLive London 2014 concluded with top-notch presentations from Symfony and industry gurus. It was an exceptional opportunity being able to attend this conference and meet those people.

Here is my summary about some of the talks I had the chance to attend:

Newsletter #57

Hello, It’s #TechThursday at #namshi again!

News from the IT Team:

Hallal has already landed in London for Symfony Live conference and he is having a blast.

And we are back with some more proposals to the Confoo conference in Canada: check, and support them by voting for Alex, for Lucio and for Geshan, go team Namshi!

But what has the team been looking at over the past week? Below you’ll find the usual list of interesting articles we discovered in the past 7 days.

Design, Architecture and Code on the Edge @Confoo

At Namshi we run a product that needs to evolve quickly and be ready to change: new features and technologies are integrated every week to be able to keep up to date with the market and the technology around us. That’s how we started using nodejs, Angular, Docker, SPDY and much more…

Do you want to hear more?

Newsletter #56

Hello, It’s #TechThursday at #namshi again!

News from the IT Team:

Hallal wrote an interesting post about Shisha: a nodejs library for creating smoke tests in no time.

We submitted some proposals to the Confoo conference in Canada: check, and support them by voting for Hallal and for Cirpo!

But what has the team been looking at over the past week? Below you’ll find the usual list of interesting articles we discovered in the past 7 days.

Shisha, Smoke Test Those URLs!

Here comes Shisha! Yet another NodeJs based application from Namshi! Shisha is a smoke testing module, what is smoke testing? Read about it here. In short, smoke testing is a term coming from Electrical Engineering, where an Electronic chip is simply tested by plugging it into an electric source and observing if smoke comes out! How does shisha relate to this? Well, just give shisha a list or a file of URLs and expected HTTP status code for each URL, and it will assert the expected status codes and show you back a report! It serves as a quick and fast testing platform for your website/APIs. Instead of waiting for a unit or an integration test to be prepared and run, simply set shisha to run on your URLs, it is fast and simple!